Talking to Myself

8 Sep

I tend to talk a lot. If you were to ask someone who knows me if I am talkative, you would get an answer along the lines of “He’s quiet”. But I do talk a lot. I talk to myself all the time. Some people might think that does not count as talking. Well, what is talking anyway? Isn’t it just conversing with someone? Can’t I converse with myself?
But that’s besides the point.

I talk to myself so much because I think too much. Whenever I have a decision to make, whether minor or major, I think of every possible outcome and the consequences of all those outcomes. It’s a long process, believe me. Sometimes it’s profitable, but other times it just over-complicates everything for no real reason at all.

I do that a lot with spirituality as well. My rational side discusses with my spiritual side about a certain topic in the bible and very soon I’m having conversations with myself. I’ve done this a lot in the past with the gospel.

Here’s a snippet of what I mean. (I paraphrased a lot. I don’t use this kind of vocabulary when talking to myself.)

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Rational: Because of God’s sovereignty, He allows Satan to do certain things, correct? God “allowed” sin to happen in the garden. God “allowed” Satan to enter the garden in the form of a serpent and God “allowed” Satan to tell vicious lies to Eve about the forbidden fruit. But how can God, a supposedly loving heavenly Father, let such malice and evil enter and torment His creation? Does He not want the best for His children? Does He not love His creation? Our faith is blind if we worship a deceitful God.

Spiritual: We were made for the son to be glorified. We were made to lift our eyes to the heavens and say “My help comes from You”. We have no good besides Him who molded us in our mother’s womb.

The next question is, “How does sin factor into our lives which must be fully devoted to glorifying Christ?” What you do not see, Rational, is that sin is both the ending of something terrible and the beginning of something magnificently beautiful. Because of our sin, we fail. Because of our old nature, we fall short of glory. But it is by the tragedies of our sin that we turn to God for everlasting righteousness. The life full of sin with no reason to boast in itself is the most likely to accept Christ and all his Father’s promises. A life with little sin and many accomplishments will reject righteousness in Christ. It believes that it can obtain righteousness itself without God’s intervention.

So you realize now how important sin is for God to receive glory? Without it, there would be no motivation to turn to Him and render Him glory.

This however does not mean that we are to continue living in sin to give Him even more glory. With His son’s sacrifice, we have new life and are dead to the sinful life we lived before coming to Christ. Sin is done with. We are victorious in His name and nothing, especially more sin, can separate us from the love of God.

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Well this is part one. Maybe I’ll write a part two next week, or maybe not. For now, I think  I’ll just continue to blab away… to myself.

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3 Responses to “Talking to Myself”

  1. Michael Gormley September 8, 2010 at 4:44 pm #

    WHAT YOU MUST DO TO BE SAVED

    Best of all, the promise of eternal life is a gift, freely offered to us by God (CCC 1727).

    The Catholic Church teaches what the apostles taught and what the Bible teaches: We are saved by grace alone, but not by faith alone (which is what “Bible Christians” teach; see James. 2:24).

    When we come to God and are justified (that is, enter a right relationship with God), nothing preceding justification, whether faith or good works, earns grace.

    But then God plants his love in our hearts, and we should live out our faith by doing acts of love (Galatians 6:2).

    Even though only God’s grace enables us to love others, these acts of love please him, and he promises to reward them with eternal life (Romans 2:6–7, Galatians 6:6–10).

    Thus good works are meritorious. When we first come to God in faith, we have nothing in our hands to offer him.

    Then he gives us grace to obey his commandments in love, and he rewards us with salvation when we offer these acts of love back to him (Romans 2:6–11, Galatians 6:6–10, Matthew 25:34–40).

    15 Nor do they light a lamp and then put it under a bushel basket; it is set on a lampstand, where it gives light to all in the house.

    16 Just so, your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father. (Matthew 5: 15-16)

    Jesus said it is not enough to have faith in him; we also must obey his commandments. “Why do you call me ‘Lord, Lord,’ but do not do the things I command?” (Luke 6:46, Matthew 7:21–23, 19:16–21).

    We do not “earn” our salvation through good works (Ephesians 2:8–9, Romans 9:16), but our faith in Christ puts us in a special grace-filled relationship with God so that our obedience and love, combined with our faith, will be rewarded with eternal life (Romans 2:7, Galatians 6:8–9).

    Paul said, “God is the one who, for his good purpose, works in you both to desire and to work” (Philippians 2:13).

    John explained that “the way we may be sure that we know him is to keep his commandments. Whoever says, ‘I know him,’ but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him” (1 John 2:3–4, 3:19–24, 5:3–4).

    Since no gift can be forced on the recipient—gifts always can be rejected—even after we become justified, we can throw away the gift of salvation.

    We throw it away through grave (mortal) sin (John 15:5–6, Romans 11:22–23, 1 Corinthians 15:1–2; CCC 1854–1863). Paul tells us, “The wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23).

    Read his letters and see how often Paul warned Christians against sin! He would not have felt compelled to do so if their sins could not exclude them from heaven (see, for example, 1 Corinthians 6:9–10, Galatians 5:19–21).

    Paul reminded the Christians in Rome that God “will repay everyone according to his works: eternal life for those who seek glory, honour, and immortality through perseverance in good works, but wrath and fury to those who selfishly disobey the truth and obey wickedness” (Romans 2:6–8).

    Sins are nothing but evil works (CCC 1849–1850). We can avoid sins by habitually performing good works.

    Every saint has known that the best way to keep free from sins is to embrace regular prayer, the sacraments (the Eucharist first of all), and charitable acts.

  2. Matthew September 8, 2010 at 5:47 pm #

    I disagree Michael.

    Sins are not “nothing but evil works” and we cannot avoid them by “habitually performing good works”. Was Mother Theresa completely without sin? Was Ghandi?

    The first sin, in the garden, was not just an evil work. It was a complete outright disobeying of God’s command. Sin in itself is choosing our way instead of choosing God’s way. Every time we sin, we tell God “My way is better than yours.”

    If I give $1000 tomorrow away to the poor or to a church, will that make me sinless for that day? We are all with sin, we have all fallen short of God’s glory (Rom. 3:23) because of Adam’s original sin. There is no way to get rid of our sin, but we can get rid of the consequences of our sin through the blood of the perfect lamb slain for us. Our sin is still there, but God sees His son’s righteousness when He looks at us.

    So we should try to avoid sin with His word and prayer (the eucharist is not necessary) but not by performing “good acts”.

  3. Kansas Bankruptcy September 30, 2010 at 9:31 am #

    If I give $1000 tomorrow away to the poor or to a church, will that make me sinless for that day? We are all with sin, we have all fallen short of God’s glory (Rom. 3:23) because of Adam’s original sin. There is no way to get rid of our sin, but we can get rid of the consequences of our sin through the blood of the perfect lamb slain for us. Our sin is still there, but God sees His son’s righteousness when He looks at us.
    +1

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